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Outdoors activities

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Outdoors activities

Although Reykjanes peninsula is rather populated compared to other regions in Iceland and close to the capital of Reykjavík, guests do not have to travel far for outdoors experience and the area offers a great verity of outdoors activities.

 

Hiking Tours - Hiking

A popular mode of travel and many hiking trails exist. 

You can hike on your own but also with a guide. 

Midsummer night hike in Þorbjörn

Annually, The Blue Lagoon and the town of Grindavík sponsor a Midsummer night hike on the mountain Þorbjörn. On the top of the mountain there is entertainment which includes singing and camp fire. The walk ends at the Blue Lagoon which is open past midnight that evening. This is an entertaining recreation for the whole family. For information about the forthcoming Midsummer day hike visit the official website of Grindavík www.grindavik.is or www.bluelagoon.com.

Bird Watching

Iceland’s bird population is unique and diverse.

It offers bird watching enthusiasts the opportunity for that rare observation.

Keilir

Keilir is a hyaloclastite mountain.

It was created during subglacial eruptions during the ice age. It´s shape makes it distinctive and according to geologists, it probably is a crater plug. In spite of its steep slopes, it is not too difficult to climb, and the view from its top on a fine day is to be remembered. Keilir is the most distinctive landmark of Reykjanes and a symbol of the Reykjanes peninsula. On top of the mountain is a concrete table with a view direction map on a metal plate.

Location: 4x4 cars can drive on Höskuldarvegi and there is a parking at Oddafell and from there is a trail to Keilir.

From Höskuldarvellir there is only 3 km walk to Keilir.

Snowmobile & Snowcat Tours

Many agencies offer snowmobile or ATV tours.

They are suitable for anyone looking for a little excitement and adventure while on vacation.

Kayak Tours

Kayaking is an exhilarating and fun experience.

Many agencies throughout the country offer kayak tours on lakes, ponds and the ocean.

Cave Exploring

For spelunkers and potholers, Iceland has scores of caves to be explored.

They are large and small, deep and shallow. Some caves may be explored without a guide and many agencies offer cave exploration tours for others.

Angling

Iceland has many lakes and rivers teeming with salmon and trout.

It attracts many anglers. The opportunities for participating are limitless.

Hopsnes

The spit on which you are standing is named Hópsnes on the west side and Þórkötlustaðanes on the east side. The spit is 2 km long and 1 km wide and was formed 2,800 years ago when lava flowed into the sea.

Hópsnes/Þórkötlustaðanes was formed during an eruption from a row of craters named Sundhnúkur located just north of the village of Grindavík. Port conditions in Grindavík are excellent due to this lava flow and the lagoon (Hópið) that formed beside the spit when the sea began to erode the lava and move loose materials. If the spit were not there, the village of Grindavík would probably never have been built. The fact is that it is one of six communities on the Reykjanes peninsula that owes its existence to an eruptive fissure in a volcanic system that is still active. Eruptions could occur in this area at any time.

From its earliest days, Grindavík has been one of the main fishing centres in Iceland. Sundhnúkur, from where the lava that formed the spit flowed, has navigation signals showing the route through the gap into the harbour. Travelling around the spit, one can see a number of shipwrecks that have run aground here and in the neighbourhood in the course of the 20th century. There are information signs by some of the wrecks.

Both the village and fishing-vessel operations flourished in the early 20th century. Numerous rowing boats and later motor boats were operated from Þórkötlustaðanes. There are a good number of remains of the settlement that is no more, such as entrance cairns, fish-storage huts, ice storages, fish-processing houses, liver-processing and salt huts. The fishing operation moved to the location that is now Grindavík harbour in 1939, when a group of energetic Grindavík residents took it upon themselves to dig a channel through the reef that had hitherto prevented boats from entering the Hópið lagoon. The Hópsnes lighthouse was built in 1928.

Today the area is a popular recreational area with a hiking and biking trail.

Bicycle Rentals

Short and long term bicycle rentals and guided bicycle tours. 

 

Mt Thorbjorn

A free standing, hyaloclastite mountain north of Grindavik.

It offers great panoramic view over most of the Reykjanes Peninsula on fine days. The northeastern part of the mountain depicts thermal activity an to its north and northeast is an extensive high temperature area. It is split by a fissure called "The Thieves´ Gap" (Thjofagja), occupied by 15 thieves according to the legend. They were eventually overwhelmed and killed by trickery.

Horse Activities

There are many horse rentals in Iceland offering short or longer rides.

The Icelandic horse is a favorite of many and known around the world as an excellent steed.

 

The Reykjanes Peninsula

Towns & Villages

Visitors to Iceland who arrive via Keflavik International Airport on the Reykjanes Peninsula may be somewhat surprised by the landscape that greets their eyes as they touch down in Iceland for the very first time. A seemingly endless, green-grey moss-topped lava field blankets the peninsula for as far as the eye can see, and it is this strange and rather other-worldly sight that is your first glimpse of the land of fire and ice. 

Map Garður Sandgerði Reykjanesbær Vogar Grindavík