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Cultural centers are located in most parts of the country.

Hosting all kinds of cultural events and educational programs for people of all ages. 

The Icelandic Museum of Rock ´n´ Roll
The Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll (Rokksafn Íslands) is a new museum about the history of popular music in Iceland. The museum was opened in 2014 and is located in Keflavik in Reykjanesbær, only a 5-minute drive away from Keflavik International airport. The museum’s main attraction is a timeline of Iceland’s popular music history. Visitors who would like to dive deeper into the history can get an iPad guided tour to read more and listen to the music throughout Iceland’s history. Other attractions include the very popular sound lab where guests can try instruments such as an electric drum kit, electric guitar and electric bass. There’s also a karaoke singing booth where guests have the possibility to sing and record video of the themselves and send it directly to their email address or social media. Guests can also visit the museums’ cinema where documentaries about Icelandic music run all day long, try out interactive solutions to dive deeper into the history of featured artists such as Björk, Sigur Rós, Of Monsters and Men, Kaleo and many more, get an insight into what it is like to be an audio engineer on a mixing desk that features Icelandic music and visit the gift shop where there are books, DVD, CD’s and LP’s with Icelandic music along with various museum merchandise. At the museum guests can sit down, listen to the music and have a cup of coffee... or tea... or hot chocolate, whichever sounds good. The museum café offers coffee from Kaffitár which is a local roasterie, specializing in importing, roasting and serving the finest Arabica coffee beans. The Icelandic Museum of Rock 'n' Roll is for everyone. For those who love Icelandic music and those who want to discover Icelandic Music.   Children find the sound lab particularly interesting along with the interactive parts of the museum. The museum is open daily all year round except for New Year's Day, Good Friday, Easter Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve. Opening times are 11am-6pm daily. “The Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll is as eccentric in its telling as the tale it celebrates.” David Fricke, Rolling Stone.   
Folk Museum in Garður
The municipal museum in Garðskagi is located in a natural paradise, which blends the beauty of the landscape with its rich animal and birdlife. The museum was first opened in November 1995 in the old processing houses in Garður. The museum has both a Folk and Maritime Museum. It has an outstanding engine collection of Guðni Ingimundarson. There are over 60 engines on display and almost every one of them is functional. Many important items from the municipal history of Garður are located in the museum, items which were essential for the livelihood on both land and sea The Museum is a great point of interest for visitors as it tells the story of how fishing developed and the history of the people who lived and worked in the community. A restaurant and camping site with facilities is on-site and if you are lucky you might see dolphins and whales near the shore from the terrace of the restaurant. Summer opening is 10-17 From the 1st May - 30. Sept. From October the Museum can be booked for groups.
Hljómahöll Conference Center
Hljómahöll is a cultural and conference center in Reykjanesbær. An important forum has been created for conferences, meetings and all kinds of cultural events. The historical community house Stapi is a part of Hljómahöll which is still in full use. The Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll is a big part of the house (Hljómahöll) and is a great attraction for tourists all over the world who want to learn about the history of pop and rock in Iceland. The museum offers various ways to learn about this remarkable history; documentary films, music, souvenirs, an app and guests can actively involve them selves by trying out f.ex. drums, bass and guitars. In Hljómahöllin the Music School in Reykjanesbær has a new and great space for teaching and learning. With the advent of Hljómahöll we hope to see more possibilities for cultural and creative work in Reykjanes. Halls Hljómahöll’s halls are great for various occasions, such as conferences, meetings, dance’s, birthdays, annuals, receptions after funerals etc. Please send us an e-mail and we will answer all hall related questions.
KVIKAN - House of Culture and Natural Resources
In order to enjoy a couple of visits to the Blue Lagoon it makes a lot of  sense to stay overnight in the nearby fishing community of Grindavík, onthe south side of the Reykjanes peninsula, Grindavik is worth a visit on its own. This is a pleasant area to do some hiking (for all levels), followed by a refreshing swim at the local pool. Settled in the year 934, the town has remained one of the main sources of salted fish in Iceland. Now there are approximately 2500 inhabitants, most of whom base their livelihoods on fishing and fish-related industries. Grindavík's illustrious history goes back to when it was a major trading centre during the Middle Ages in the booming Hanseatic period. It was raided by pirates many times and has been the site of many ship- wrecks over the ages. There is a statue dedicated to the families of local fishermen lost at sea, but even more poignant are the remains of two more recent shipwrecks and their memorials along a circular hike around the town. There is still an active fishing fleet in Grindavík and most of their catches go to the local factory that specialises in processing salted fish for export. In the late 19th century, salted fish was to Iceland what oil is to Saudi Arabia, and indeed, the image of a golden cod was on Iceland's original coat of arms. As you stroll along one of the best harbours in Iceland, you will arrive at the Icelandic Saltfish Museum, where you can learn more about the industry that is an important element in Iceland's economic development and prosperity. It opened in 2002 and is dedicated to the history of the salt fish, with a vividly depicted exhibition on the struggle for survival, which is a metaphor for the country as well as the salt fish industry.The saltfishmuseum is located only a few minutes away from the Blue Lagoon. Visitors are guided through the museum with a CD player andcan choose between Icelandic, English, German and French. Caféteria. Opening hours Week days: Saturdays: Sundays: May 15th - September 15th 10:00-17:00 10:00-17:00 10:00-17:00 September 16th - May 14th 10:00-17:00 11:00-17:00 11:00-17:00 Also open on request for groups.