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There is no shortage of different kinds of exhibitions, all over the country. They are dedicated to anything from toys to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Art exhibitions also vary greatly and may be found in all sorts of places.

KVIKAN - House of Culture and Natural Resources
In order to enjoy a couple of visits to the Blue Lagoon it makes a lot of  sense to stay overnight in the nearby fishing community of Grindavík, onthe south side of the Reykjanes peninsula, Grindavik is worth a visit on its own. This is a pleasant area to do some hiking (for all levels), followed by a refreshing swim at the local pool. Settled in the year 934, the town has remained one of the main sources of salted fish in Iceland. Now there are approximately 2500 inhabitants, most of whom base their livelihoods on fishing and fish-related industries. Grindavík's illustrious history goes back to when it was a major trading centre during the Middle Ages in the booming Hanseatic period. It was raided by pirates many times and has been the site of many ship- wrecks over the ages. There is a statue dedicated to the families of local fishermen lost at sea, but even more poignant are the remains of two more recent shipwrecks and their memorials along a circular hike around the town. There is still an active fishing fleet in Grindavík and most of their catches go to the local factory that specialises in processing salted fish for export. In the late 19th century, salted fish was to Iceland what oil is to Saudi Arabia, and indeed, the image of a golden cod was on Iceland's original coat of arms. As you stroll along one of the best harbours in Iceland, you will arrive at the Icelandic Saltfish Museum, where you can learn more about the industry that is an important element in Iceland's economic development and prosperity. It opened in 2002 and is dedicated to the history of the salt fish, with a vividly depicted exhibition on the struggle for survival, which is a metaphor for the country as well as the salt fish industry.The saltfishmuseum is located only a few minutes away from the Blue Lagoon. Visitors are guided through the museum with a CD player andcan choose between Icelandic, English, German and French. Caféteria. Opening hours Week days: Saturdays: Sundays: May 15th - September 15th 10:00-17:00 10:00-17:00 10:00-17:00 September 16th - May 14th 10:00-17:00 11:00-17:00 11:00-17:00 Also open on request for groups.
The Giganta in the cave
The  Giganta  in  the  mountain  moved  to  the  Town  of  Reykjanes during the family and cultural festival Night of Lights in 2008 and is now located in Black Cave at the marina in Gróf. There the Giganta has been settling in her nice cave with its superb view over the bay of Keflavík and Faxaflói. The Giganta is originally the creation of author Herdís Egilsdóttir who has written 16 stories about the little girl Sigga and her friend the Giganta in the mountain, the last one describing her migration to the Town of Reykjanes. The design and making of the cave and the Giganta was in the hands of Norðanbál art group. The Giganta is full-sized and sits sleeping in a rocking chair in the kitchen. Opening hours 10:00-17:00 every day
Folk Museum in Garður & Lighthouses
The municipal museum in Garðskagi is located in a natural paradise, which blends the beauty of the landscape with its rich animal and birdlife. The museum was first opened in November 1995 in the old processing houses in Garður. The museum has both a Folk and Maritime Museum. It has an outstanding engine collection of Guðni Ingimundarson. There are over 60 engines on display and almost every one of them is functional. Many important items from the municipal history of Garður are located in the museum, items which were essential for the livelihood on both land and sea The Museum is a great point of interest for visitors as it tells the story of how fishing developed and the history of the people who lived and worked in the community. A restaurant and camping site with facilities is on-site and if you are lucky you might see dolphins and whales near the shore from the terrace of the restaurant. The big lighthouse has two exhibitions, Northern Lights Show and Whale Show. Fantastic view from the top balcony. Admission is included in the museum fee. There is also a campsite on Garðskagi. Opening hours: Every day between 12:00-20:00 For groups call manager, 893-8909 or email johann@gardskagi.com. 
Hljómahöll Conference Center
Hljómahöll is a cultural and conference center in Reykjanesbær. An important forum has been created for conferences, meetings and all kinds of cultural events. The historical community house Stapi is a part of Hljómahöll which is still in full use. The Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll is a big part of the house (Hljómahöll) and is a great attraction for tourists all over the world who want to learn about the history of pop and rock in Iceland. The museum offers various ways to learn about this remarkable history; documentary films, music, souvenirs, an app and guests can actively involve them selves by trying out f.ex. drums, bass and guitars. In Hljómahöllin the Music School in Reykjanesbær has a new and great space for teaching and learning. With the advent of Hljómahöll we hope to see more possibilities for cultural and creative work in Reykjanes. Halls Hljómahöll’s halls are great for various occasions, such as conferences, meetings, dance’s, birthdays, annuals, receptions after funerals etc. Please send us an e-mail and we will answer all hall related questions.
Reykjanes Museum of Heritage
The  Reykjanes  Heritage  Museum  presents  temporary  exhibitions which  address  specific  aspects  in  local  history  of  the  region  and somewhat  the  whole  country.   A  new  exhibition  by  the  Reykjanes Heritage Museum, opened in the spring of 2012. It covers the winter fishing season, “Vetrarvertíðin”: For centuries Icelanders travelled on foot from their homes to the fishing ports in West and South-West of Iceland. They arrived late in January and stayed for 3 months untill early May when they walked back. This was the best season to catch the fish as it came nearer the coast to spawn. The fish was then hung up to dry. The seasonal fishing was very important as dried fish was part of the daily food and the most important export of Icelanders. The foundation of the seaside towns and villages in the area is the nearby rich fishing grounds as is depicted in the exhibition.
Gardskagi - campsite
The campsite at Garðskagi is perfect for visitors seeking freedom and open views of the ocean. It is located at Garðskagi Point and is open all year long. Garðskagi Point, the northernmost part of the Reykjanes Peninsula, offers great experience for visitors with its two lighthouses, beautiful beach, and fantastic sunsets. It is a great place to see the Northern Lights and have a good meal and a drink while waiting for them to appear. The two lighthouses help create a unique atmosphere and the weather adds up to memorable experiences, whether it be the still morning fog or the screaming, crushing winter waves. The lighthouses were built in 1897 and 1944. One is the second oldest and the other the biggest in Iceland. Garðskagi is a premium site for bird-watching where whales can also often be observed from the coast. Garðskagi is truly a hidden gem and one of the great destinations within the recently established Reykjanes Geopark. The big lighthouse, has two exhibitions, Northern Lights Show and Whale Show. Fantastic view from the top balcony. Admission is included in the museum fee. There is also a campsite on Garðskagi. Restaurant Röstin on the second floor of the Heritage and Maritime Museum offers food for a very reasonable price. Its only about 20 m from the coast and has fantastic view of the ocean. Great place to watch beautiful sunsets in the summer or to have a nice meal while waiting for the Northern Lights in the winter. Opening hours: All year For groups call manager, 893-8909 or email johann@gardskagi.com.   
Reykjanes Art Museum
Reykjanes Art Museum presents several new art exhibitions every year. The museum is located in Duus Museum, the Art and Cultural Center of Reykjanesbær along with Reykjanes Maritime Center and Reykjanes Heritage Museum. Reykjanes Art Museum presents visual arts through diverse exhibitions, lectures, guidance, publications and their website www.reykjanesbaer.is/listasafn. The museum is open everyday from 12pm – 5pm.
Reykjanes Maritime Center
The Reykjanes Maritime Center was opened on May 11, 2002 and is home to a collection of over 100 model boats built by retired local skipper Grímur Karlsson. Hand-crafted to a high degree of perfection and painstaking detail, they offer fascinating insight into Iceland's maritime history, beginning with the graceful masted schooners of the mid- and late 19th century, and ending with the steam and diesel-powered trawlers of the 20th century. Open every day from 12pm -5pm.
Aurora Basecamp
Aurora Basecamp is a one-of-a-kind facility, offering guests the chance to experience a real-time, indoor simulation of the Northern Lights, in a warm and relaxing environment. From there, our expert guides lead you out into the Icelandic night, and if the conditions are right you’ll get breathtaking views and photos of the real thing! Located just 20 minutes from Reykjavik, Aurora Basecamp provides a comfortable and inviting setting for the perfect Northern Lights experience.
Sudurnes Science and Learning Center
If you are interested in the Icelandic nature and wildlife, sea creatures, research related to the area and art, the Sudurnes Science and Learning Center is a place you must visit! The center offers three exciting exhibitions. They include a nature gallery where you can look at and touch various stuffed animals from the Icelandic wildlife and see live sea creatures. There is also a collection of shells and whale bones in addition to the only stuffed walrus in Iceland. In the historical gallery you can visit the magnificent exhibition Attraction of the Poles on the life of the French medical doctor and polar scientist Jean-Baptiste Charcot. A model of his research ship, Pourquoi-Pas?, that perished off the coast of Iceland in 1936 is part of the exhibition. In the art gallery you will find the art and educational exhibition Hidden World of the Seaweed Fairies. The exhibition weaves scientific knowledge about the ocean into the magical world of the seaweed fairies. Sudurnes Science and Learning Center is an ideal place to visit for families and others hungry for knowledge. Join our treasure hunt that will take you on an exciting journey looking for various animals, plants and historical places. Bring your findings back to the Center for further research. Opening hours Summer (May 1st – August 31st) Monday – Friday: 10:00 to 16:00 Saturday and Sunday: 13:00 to 17:00   Winter (September 1st – April 30th) Exhibitions closed.   Flexible opening hours for groups (minimum 20 persons) year-round – please call 423-7555. For further information see their website.
Reykjanes Museum of Heritage - Stekkjarkot
Stekkjarkot is a classic example of the roughly built turf, stone and timber cottage-type houses once common on the Reykjanes peninsula and other coastal areas of Iceland, Stekkjarkot was opened to the public in 1993 by Iceland’s then-president Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, following a year of restorations. The older part of the cottage, with its open hearth, dates back to the 19th century, and is said to have been home to a maidservant with an infant daughter who slept on the earthen floor. The newer part dates from the farm’s last days of habitation, by which time floorboards covered the living room and kitchen, a coal-fired stove provided both cooking facilities and heat, and conditions for those who lived there do not seem to have been too bad. Stekkjarkot is open on request and there is free admission. Please contact byggdasafn@reykjanesbaer.is for further information. 
Duus Museum - Cultural Center
Duus Museum is the Art and Cultural Center of Reykjanesbær where you can experience diverse exhibitions and cultural activities all year round. The museum houses exhibition halls for the Art Museum of Reykjanesbær and Heritage Museum of Reykjanesbær which offer new and exciting exhibitions throughout the year. The Reykjanes Maritime Center displays a collection of over 100 model boats built by the skipper Grímur Karlsson. A Tourist Information and Reykjanes Geopark Visitor Center are also located in the museum. We are open every day from 12:00 – 17:00.  
The Icelandic Museum of Rock ´n´ Roll
The Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll (Rokksafn Íslands) is a new museum about the history of popular music in Iceland. The museum was opened in 2014 and is located in Keflavik in Reykjanesbær, only a 5-minute drive away from Keflavik International airport. The museum’s main attraction is a timeline of Iceland’s popular music history. Visitors who would like to dive deeper into the history can get an iPad guided tour to read more and listen to the music throughout Iceland’s history. Other attractions include the very popular sound lab where guests can try instruments such as an electric drum kit, electric guitar and electric bass. There’s also a karaoke singing booth where guests have the possibility to sing and record video of the themselves and send it directly to their email address or social media. Guests can also visit the museums’ cinema where documentaries about Icelandic music run all day long, try out interactive solutions to dive deeper into the history of featured artists such as Björk, Sigur Rós, Of Monsters and Men, Kaleo and many more, get an insight into what it is like to be an audio engineer on a mixing desk that features Icelandic music and visit the gift shop where there are books, DVD, CD’s and LP’s with Icelandic music along with various museum merchandise. At the museum guests can sit down, listen to the music and have a cup of coffee... or tea... or hot chocolate, whichever sounds good. The museum café offers coffee from Kaffitár which is a local roasterie, specializing in importing, roasting and serving the finest Arabica coffee beans. The Icelandic Museum of Rock 'n' Roll is for everyone. For those who love Icelandic music and those who want to discover Icelandic Music.   Children find the sound lab particularly interesting along with the interactive parts of the museum. The museum is open daily all year round except for New Year's Day, Good Friday, Easter Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve. Opening times are 11am-6pm daily. “The Icelandic Museum of Rock ‘n’ Roll is as eccentric in its telling as the tale it celebrates.” David Fricke, Rolling Stone.   
Röstin Restaurant
Röstin restaurant is located on the upper floor of the Heritage Museum in Garðskagi. We offer great food at reasonable prices all year round. The view is spectacular from the balcony where you can watch the sunset over Snæfellsjökul Glacier, the abundant bird life and sometimes whales, just off the shore. A visit to the Folk and Maritime Museum downstairs and the big lighthouse is a perfect addition to a good meal in Röstin. The lighthouses in Garðskagi were constructed in 1897 and 1944. The spectacular seascapes at Garðskagi are a highlight, as is the abundant birdlife that migrates to the area every spring. The big lighthouse, is the biggest in the country, has two exhibitions, Northern Lights Show and Whale Show. Fantastic view from the top balcony. Admission is included in the museum fee. There is also a campsite on Garðskagi. Opening hours: Every day between 12:00-20:00 For groups call manager, 893-8909 or email johann@gardskagi.com. 
Viking World
Vikingaheimar is the home of the Viking Ship Íslendingur (the Icelander). Built in 1996, Icelander is an exact replica of the famous Gokstadship, a remarkable archaeological find of an almost completely intact Viking ship, excavated in Norway in 1882. Captain Gunnar Marel Eggertsson was inspired to build a replica of this beautiful ship based on his own background as shipbuilder and sailor. He copied the original nail for nail. In the year 2000, with a grant from the Leifur Eiríksson Commission of Iceland, he sailed from Iceland to New York, a journey of 4200 nautical miles. His voyage brought world-wide attention to Leif Eiriksson's and Bjarni Herjólfsson's discovery of America, dated, according to the Icelandic sagas, to exactly 1000 A.D. Building Icelander was an extraordinary achievement;at 23 metres long, 5.25 meters wide and with a holding capacity of 80 tons (by modern standards), it took 2 years of effort.The sail is 130 square meters and the mast is 18 meters in length. Made from pine and oak, scholars believe this was the most common type of ship in use during the Viking Age. Vikingaheimar is also a home to the exhibition The North Atlantic Viking Saga, originally shown at the Smithsonian Institution during the summer of 2000. Launched in Washington D.C. by King Hakon of Norway, and with a State Dinner at the White House, it then traveling to 6 other cities throughout North America. This exhibition, like the sailing of Icelander, celebrated the millennium anniversary of the Viking discovery of North America, shedding light on the latest scholarly research into the Norse settlement and explorations of unknown lands.Gunnar Marel and his crew of 8 left Iceland on Icelandic Independence day, the 17th of June, with a send off from the Prime Minister of Iceland. When it finally arrived in New York on October 5th-where it was greeted by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and Mayor Rudolf Guiliani--the ship had made stops at 22 harbors. In addition to the festivities with kings, queens, presidents and mayors, when the ship arrived, visitors also streamed to see it while it was docked at each location, all told about 450,000 people came on board. These two fine projects, both celebrating Iceland's central role in the discovery of North America 1000 years ago by the Norse Vikings, have now found a permanent home in Vikinga Aldan (Viking Wave), the central building on the Vikingaheimar grounds. A spectacular modern building, it also offers beautiful views of the surrounding bay, Faxaflói. These two fine projects, both celebrating Iceland's central role in the discovery of North America 1000 years ago by the Norse Vikings, have now found a permanent home in Vikinga Aldan (Viking Wave), the central building on the Vikingaheimar grounds. A spectacular modern building, it also offers beautiful views of the surrounding bay, Faxaflói.

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Photo gallery Vogar 190 Vogar 440-6200